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Priorities for 2014: Strengthening California’s Higher Education Systems

Here’s food for thought . . . Companies need colleges.

Without world-class talent raised or recruited here, our region would be one more one-hit wonder, rather than the innovation capital of the world.

That’s one reason why the Silicon Valley Leadership Group will focus even further on ensuring that higher education serves everyone who wishes to call Silicon Valley and California home.

With tangible goals and specific outcomes, we will be partnering in 2014 with our Community Colleges, UC campuses, CSU system and private sector universities to make them more affordable and accessible for our students, more compelling for faculty and staff, and more transparent and accountable to taxpayers.

Our Higher Education Task Force, under the creative leadership of UC Santa Cruz Chancellor George Blumenthal and Lockheed Martin Space Systems President Tory Bruno, already is working directly with the new President of the UC system, Janet Napolitano, to achieve specific goals that will drive the world’s best research campuses to greater success.

So why does any of this matter to you and me? Bottom line – It’s about jobs. Jobs for us and jobs for our kids. You see, in the United States today, a young person at least 25-years-old without a college diploma, suffers from an unemployment rate of 7.7 percent. The equivalent 25-year-old, with a bachelor’s degree in any subject, enjoys an unemployment rate of only 3.3 percent.

That’s why our work to improve California’s higher education systems is so important to the 382 CEOs who own the Silicon Valley Leadership Group. If we do a good job today, it will lead to more jobs, for more young people, tomorrow.

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  1. Actually, the headline kind of a mnoismer since both of those community foundations have relatively little ‘control’ over the grantmaking by their donor advised funds. Peninsula had discretion over 5.6% of their grants in 2005, and CFSV had less than 2% (cite: League of CA Community Fdns). What will that figure be for the new entity? The new CFPSV will be a major investor in financial markets, but what about its investments in the local communities?

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